Lough, William

Lough, William

Junior Engineer Officer

MV Cingalese Prince (London), Merchant Navy

Died as the result of enemy action on Saturday 20 September 1941 (aged 29)

No known grave

Commemorated:

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Tower Hill Memorial, London (Panel 28)

Bangor and District War Memorial

Bangor Parish Church of Ireland Church (St. Comgall’s)

Family grave headstone in Dundonald Cemetery (Grave F4. 655)

BIOGRAPHY

William Lough was born on 26 May 1912 at 33 Welland Street, Belfast and he was a son of Alexander and Elizabeth Johnston Lough (nee Murdock) who lived in Tamar Street, Belfast and then in Welland Street, Belfast.  Alexander was born on 23 June 1869 in Larne, Elizabeth was born in 1869 in Comber and they were married on 16 April 1892 in Clifton Street Presbyterian Church, Belfast.  Alexander Lough from 28 Welland Street, Belfast was a son of Alexander Lough, a labourer.  Elizabeth Murdock from 25 Fourth Street, Belfast was a daughter of Richard Murdock, a labourer.

Alexander and Elizabeth Johnston Lough (nee Murdock) had thirteen children:

Annie (born 25 January 1893 at 85 Tamar Street, Belfast)

Ellen (born 13 April 1894 at 85 Tamar Street, Belfast; her married name was Mollinson and she died in childbirth in Toronto, along with her infant son, on 1 May 1929)

Robert (Bob, born 21 April 1896 at 124 Tamar Street, Belfast; died on active service 2 July 1916)

Mary (born 1 December 1897 at 75 Tamar Street, Belfast)

Elizabeth (born 27 June 1899 at 39 Welland Street, Belfast; died of tubercular meningitis 20 April 1916 aged 16 and was buried in Comber Cemetery)

Alexander (born 3 August 1901 at 33 Welland Street, Belfast)

Richard (born 24 March 1903 at 33 Welland Street, Belfast)

Jane (born 23 April 1904 at 33 Welland Street, Belfast)

Henry (born 3 June 1906 at 33 Welland Street, Belfast)

Edward James (born 30 August 1908 at 33 Welland Street, Belfast)

Margaret (Maggie, born 29 May 1910 at 33 Welland Street, Belfast)

William (born 12.30 am on 26 May 1912 at 33 Welland Street, Belfast)

Charles (born 12.35 am on 26 May 1912 at 33 Welland Street, Belfast)

During the First World War Robert (Bob) Lough served as a Rifleman (No. 13036) with the 8th Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles and he died of wounds on 2 July 1916.  He was buried in Knightsbridge Cemetery, Mesnil-Martinsart, Somme, France and he is commemorated on Page 345 in the Journey of Remembering – Belfast Book of Honour compiled by Derek Smyth.  Charles Lough (William’s twin) moved to England and he died in Bolton in January 1980.  Annie, Ellen, Alexander Junior and Edward James all moved to Canada.  Margaret Lough moved to England and during the Second World War her husband, Stoker First Class Thomas Murray, served with the Royal Navy.  He was killed in 1945 when his ship was torpedoed off the coast of Mayo.  Alexander Lough Senior worked as a general labourer for Avoniel Irish Distillery in Belfast until his death in the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast on 6 September 1922.  He was 52 when he died as the result of an accident in the distillery and he was buried in Dundonald Cemetery.

On 8 November 1941 it was reported in the County Down Spectator that Junior Engineer William Lough had died on active service.  His mother Elizabeth was living at 72 Upper Newtownards Road, Belfast with her daughter Mary and son-in-law William Whiteside.  Before that, Elizabeth Lough lived at 54 Victoria Road, Bangor.  Elizabeth Lough died on 8 May 1947 (aged 77) and was buried alongside her husband in Dundonald Cemetery.

Junior Engineer William Lough served aboard the motor merchant ship MV Cingalese Prince which was built in 1929 by the Blythswood Shipbuilding Company Ltd., Glasgow and owned by Furness, Withy and Company Ltd., Liverpool.  She was unescorted on 20 September 1941 when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-111 near St. Paul Rocks off the coast of Brazil.  Almost 60 lives were lost.  Her scheduled voyage was from Bombay to Capetown to Trinidad to Liverpool and she had on board a general cargo including manganese ore and pig iron.

Junior Engineer Officer William Lough was 29 when he died on 20 September 1941 and he is commemorated on Bangor and District War Memorial; in Bangor Parish Church of Ireland Church (St. Comgall’s) and on the family grave headstone in Dundonald Cemetery (Grave F4. 655).