Malcolm, William John (No. T4/160317)

Malcolm, William John (William)

Driver

No. T4/160317, 1st Divisional Train, Army Service Corps

Died of wounds on Sunday 9 December 1917

Buried:

Mendinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium (Grave III. BB. 32)

Commemorated:

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Bangor and District War Memorial

Royal British Legion (Bangor Branch) Memorial Plaque

Comrades of the Great War (Bangor Branch) Album in North Down Museum

Groomsport Parish Church of Ireland Church

First Bangor Presbyterian Church

BIOGRAPHY

William John Malcolm was born on 18 July 1891 in Moy, Co Tyrone and he was the only surviving child of John and Mary Jane Malcolm (nee Menary) who were married on 11 November 1885 in Knappagh Presbyterian Church, Eglish, Co Armagh.  John Malcolm from Killylea was a son of Robert Malcolm, a blacksmith.  Mary Jane Menary from Kilmatroy was a daughter of William Menary, a farmer.

John Malcolm worked as a baker and he and Mary Jane had two children:

William John (born 18 July 1891 in Moy, Co Tyrone)

Robert Albert (born 20 March 1893 in Moy, Co Tyrone; died of an inguinal hernia and peritonitis 6 June 1893)

On 17 July 1894, the day before his third birthday, William John’s mother, Mary Jane Malcolm died of tuberculosis (aged 28).  At the time, Mary Jane and William were living in Kilmatroy with Mary Jane’s father, William Menary.  After his mother died, William John Malcolm continued to live with his paternal grandfather.  His father, John Malcolm, boarded in Dungannon and continued to work as a baker.

After he left school, William John Malcolm worked as a grocery apprentice in Armagh before moving to Bangor where he lived at 86 Dufferin Avenue, Bangor.  Prior to the outbreak of the Great War he was employed as a grocer by Hugh Furey, draper, grocer and spirit merchant whose premises were in Main Street, Bangor.

William John Malcolm enlisted on 4 December 1915 at Larkhill and in his attestation papers it was noted that he was 24 and a grocer.  He gave as his address 86 Dufferin Avenue, Bangor.  It was noted that he was 5 feet 7½ inches tall and he cited as his next-of-kin his father, John Malcolm of Grangemore, Allistragh, Co Armagh.

Driver William John Malcolm (No. T4/160317) served with the Army Service Corps on the Home Front from 4 December 1915 to 20 May 1916 and on 21 March 1916 he and Jane (Jeannie) Cuthbert were married in Groomsport Church of Ireland Church.  William John Malcolm (aged 24) was in the Army Service Corps stationed on Salisbury Plain and he was a son of John Malcolm, a baker.  Jane Cuthbert (aged 20) was a draper’s assistant from Groomsport and she was a daughter of Alexander Cuthbert, a labourer.

It was reported that William Malcolm lived in Hill Street, Groomsport and that he was a member of Groomsport Parish Church of Ireland Church.

Driver William John Malcolm (No. T4/160317) served with the British Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 21 May 1916 until his death on 9 December 1917.  He sustained serious head and chest wounds on 29 November 1917 when the dugout he was in was hit by an enemy bomb.  He was transferred to 46 Casualty Clearing Station (CCS) and he died of his wounds on 9 December 1917.  His sole legatee was his wife, Mrs Jane Malcolm, and her address was Greenfield, Groomsport, Co Down.

Driver William John Malcolm (No. T4/160317) was buried in Mendinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium and he is commemorated on Bangor and District War Memorial; on the Royal British Legion (Bangor Branch) Memorial Plaque; in the Comrades of the Great War (Bangor Branch) Album in North Down Museum; in Groomsport Parish Church of Ireland Church and in First Bangor Presbyterian Church.